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Vintage Machines

Oct. 28th, 2012

12:39 am - Help Identifying a Pfaff

Hey everyone, I have a vintage Pfaff that I've been using for years, and I love it! However, I have recently moved into quilting and I'm looking to buy a walking foot for it, so I would like to identify it so I can get one that will work. The throat plate says System 130 on it, but it's not as old-looking as some of the 130s I've seen online. It looks more like it was manufactured in the 50s, before they did their dial-embroidery machines. The closeest I've come to finding one that it looked like was the Pfaff 330 in this blog post: sewing-machines.blogspot.ca/2011/09/pfaff-330.html

Follow the link for pics!Collapse )

Current Mood: curiouscurious

Sep. 10th, 2012

11:44 am

Last night I started the task of cleaning out my Vintage/Antique books and sewing patterns. I made it through 1 shelf.

I am offering quite a few books and ORIGINAL patterns from the 1870s-1880s for sale. I am asking below what they sell for on ebay. I have them listed in my ETSY SHOP.

I am willing to give a 10% discount if you would like to skip etsy and just use paypal. Items are shipped within 48 hrs of receipt of payment.

Feel free to ask any questions!

Jul. 26th, 2012

02:51 pm - Can't figure it out...

Hi guys,

Do you have any ideas about how I can identify and pinpoint exactly what this machine is? I think it says "Revere", not Revene (as the tag states). But I cannot find any matches online! :(

Jul. 25th, 2012

08:22 pm - My Singers: 500A & 15-91

Hi everyone!

A little bit of background: I'm VERY new to the sewing world. My mother used to be a seamstress back in the USSR, so I figure I may have some sewing genes. About a month or 2 ago, I got bit by the antique sewing machine bug!

I started searching Craigslist for older Singers, and landed a Singer 500A! The Rocketteer. :D It was in great shape, but a little dusty and very smelly (it came from a smoking home... ugh!). But I absolutely love it!

My first sewing machine: Singer 500ACollapse )

A couple of days ago I was at a thrift store and saw a sewing cabinet with a very dusty/gross/neglected Singer 15-91! Even for $25, I wasn't sure if it was worth it considering how sad it looked, and I wasn't even sure if it worked. But, I got very excited about the idea of cleaning it up. And this is what happened in 1 day:

A LOT of Elbow Grease: Singer 15-91Collapse )

I had a lot of trouble with getting the gears to work properly, but finally found the problem and managed to fix it. :) So, now the machine is running, the light works, and it's making pretty nice stitches. Woohoo!

Just thought I'd share. :)

Jul. 9th, 2012

08:41 am - Morse Duomatic

Lookey-Here!

My sister and her husband found this with a "free" sign sitting along a curb.  It's a Morse Duomatic T.Z. 50 model number 24526.

It is in a table that is in pretty good shape and there is a knee presser foot attached.  There presser foot plugs into a little socket (regular North American light-socket style) and the machine plugs into that also.  Both of those chords look good, but the chord leading from that socket to a wall socket is badly cracked and exposed.  I plugged the machine chord into the wall so I think the motor is blown, but the lights worked!

It also needs the Bobbin casing and other piece I forgot the name of (duh) but it's the other part of the bobbin housing that is crescent-shaped.  It's also missing the cams for stitch control. 

So my question is this...  Anyone know anything about this machine?   A line to parts?  Can the straight stitch function still work even without the cams?

I've never used a machine that took cams...

Thanks so much!

May. 21st, 2012

02:18 pm - 15-91?

Hi ya'll!

I'm looking at this machine and although the knob is in the right place for a 15-91 I haven't seen one in this style/color.  Anyone familiar with one like this?

Apr. 27th, 2012

08:57 pm - #503

Oh man.  There is a #503 Rocketeer on craigslist, with table for $100.  I'm trying to decide whether or not to motorize my 66-1 and get a piping/zip foot or just get a different machine altogether... help!

Edit:  66-1 cannot be motorized, and it looks like it will be significantly easier to switch out the shank to side clamping than to try and locate a zip/cord foot.

Oh, and I did not buy the Rocketeer.  What can I say?  I just want to stubbornly use what I already have...

Feb. 14th, 2012

09:47 am

I brought home an Elna Supermatic last night. I didn't mean to!

It seems to be in good shape--I bought it from the granddaughter of the original owner, though it hasn't been used in a couple of decades. It needs a good oiling to start. I sew regularly on my great-grandmother's 15-91, and have been wanting something with a built in zig-zag to experiment with knits (the zig-zag attachments for the 15-91 just aren't easily enough controllable for nice stitching for dresses), so I'm looking forward to giving this a shot.

I've got about a dozen cams though maybe only one foot (I didn't have time to really play with it and look closely at everything yesterday). I know all the Internet resources for information on Singers, what's out there for the Elnas?

Jan. 12th, 2012

08:59 pm - I bring you another mystery machine!

Howdy all! I am trying to find any and all information about this machine, and figured this just might be the community to tap. This machine is not exactly vintage, but forum members here have proven themselves to be knowledgable about machines other than those standardly vintage.

This is a machine that has been sitting in the back of our shop at work, covered in dust, looking pathetic. We know it's a grommet press, but aside from that, we know nothing about it. We have a few mismached dies floating around (we were trying a few on in the photos), but I suspect that at one point over the years somebody used the dies manually, because one of the shafts looks a little splayed out at the end, as though it were struck by a hammer. There is a little motor, and it seems as thought that's only need to run a hose that sucks air up through the male die/keeps fabric flush with the top part of the press. At least, that's the best we can figure. It doesn't look like the motor has anything to do with the actual force used to set the grommets. We can see that the table for the machine is "homemade." We don't know if it came with a table or not. This is the one machine in the shop for which we don't have the manual, so we're a little screwed there. There's no clear brand name, either, though maybe a "C & C" can be deciphered on it? Our Google-fu is failing us here.

So:

Does anyone know who made/makes this machine?

Where can we find a manual?

Does anyone know how exactly to use this machine? (I've never used anything but a manual grommet setter, with a hammer, so I don't know if the holes need to be pre-punched, or if there are dies that will punch and set the grommets at the same time?)

Does anyone know where to find dies for this machine?

Cut for picsCollapse )

Tags:

Dec. 24th, 2011

08:07 am

If I had more space this interest in vintage sewing machines would be a real problem.  The more I learn the more interesting they are!

I found this at a thrift store for eight dollars.  It's a Kenmore model 52.  I don't know the real date of manufacture, but it was during the 1950s or 60s.  It was a period of time when Kenmore machines were being manufactured by the Jaguar company in Japan.  I got it because it has feed dogs that drop so I can do free motion quilting, but after experimenting with it I found that I just loved sewing on it.


It's just so cool. 

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